Posts

Since a 2010 discovery of a winery in Armenia near the village of Areni, it is known that winemaking dates as far back as 6,100 years. Mesopotamia has also been considered to be one of the earliest winemaking regions. Now researchers have discovered traces of wine in terracotta jars in a Sicilian cave dating back to the fourth millennia BC, which is also about 6000 years ago.  That means Italians have been making and drinking wine much longer than previously thought, which was suspected to be the first millennia BC. With this recent discovery some historians argue winemaking could go back as far as 10,000 years. It didn’t take long for early humans to craft the elixir of the Gods, did it?

 

This is an image from the Armenian discovery released with the UCLA/National Geographic press announcement. The ancient-winery study was led by UCLA’s Hans Barnard and partially funded by the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration.(Photo credit: Gregory Areshian)

 

On Monday, August 24th, I woke up early, put on my yard-work clothes and headed out to participate in a harvest, a pruning, and grape sorting at a winery. Hear the people and sounds I encountered along the way during this
year’s early harvest. Click the audio player below.

Below you see winemaker Greg LaFollette at the sorting table; me after a long morning of sorting in the vineyard, pruning, sanitizing two large fermentation tanks, stacking a pallet of 56 cases of wine, and sorting incoming grapes (I loved it); A bleary-eyed Greg and Michelle Renee Mozell, who joined me that morning; Ken and Melissa Moholt-Siebert who own Ancient Oak Cellars and the Siebert Ranch who’s grapes we sorted at Owl Ridge Winery; and the view from the DuNah Vineyard in the Sonoma Coast wine region.

2015 Harvest_Greg at sorting table 2015 Harvest_Harvest 2015-Jeff 2015 Harvest_Michelle & Greg2015 Harvest_Ken & Melissa Sieberts 2015 Harvest_A view from DuNah Vineyard